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for an extended period. >> tom: but ben bernanke tells lawmakers he's moving ahead with plans to pull some of the rescue programs put in place during the financial crisis. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, february 24. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. your interest rates won't be going up for a little while longer. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress today he does not plan to raise rates anytime soon. >> tom: susie, those were magical words for investors. stocks rallied with the dow gaining 91 points. >> susie: tom, bernanke also told lawmakers about the fed's plans to wind down the emergency lending programs put in place during the financial crisis. darren gersh has details, and how the transition back to normal could impact you. >> reporter: when you've pumped more than a trillion dollars into the financial system, as the federal reser
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: bernanke's blueprint, the federal reserve chairman outlines plans to pull back the trillions of dollars the central bank has used to prop up the economy. >> suzanne: the exit strategy includes eventually removing cash from the financial system, then raising interest rates. you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, february 10. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, everyone. a huge winter storm closed the federal government again today. that didn't stop federal reserve chairman ben bernanke from making news. >> the weather postponed the hearing. >> tom: the central bank oh could take to prop up the economy. erika miller has the details. >> reporter: investors did not hear the fed chairman's testimony today, but they still could read it. all 3,496 words. economists say the most important sentence is here, on page ten. "the federal re
investigation. and fed chairman ben bernanke told lawmakers at a senate banking hearing today that he's reviewing goldman's derivative swaps with greece. >> obviously, using these instruments in a way that intentionally destabilizes a company or a country is... is counterproductive, and i'm sure the s.e.c will be looking into that. we'll certainly be evaluating what we can learn from the activities of the holding companies that we supervise here in the u.s. >> susie: at that same hearing today, bernanke repeated the same message he told house lawmakers yesterday-- he does not plan to raise interest rates anytime soon. so, if interest rates remain at historically low levels for many more months, what does that mean for stock investors? suzanne pratt asked some market pros for their opinion on that topic. >> reporter: when federal reserve chairman ben bernanke talks, wall street always pays close attention. that's because there's an inverse relationship between fed policy and stock prices. tighter money usually means stocks move lower, while easy money generally equals higher stock pric
this was news, although it is old news at this point. did ben bernanke deserve the honor of person of the year? >> well, he certainly get some credit for bringing us back from the brink, but he deserves a lot of blame for pushing us to the brink. it depends on how you balance that. the fact that the fed, he and his predecessor, alan greenspan, were largely responsible for the mismanagement of the economy, failing to have regulations that would have stopped us from getting into this mess, even as we have been pulled back from the brink. unemployment has soared. people have said we will not be back to normal unemployment until the middle of the decade. yes, it is great the banks are paying bonuses again, it is great they are making big profits. america is still in not good shape. tavis: how do you respond to the notion that i have read that the obama team, speaking of bernanke, that the obama economic team, tim geithner, larry summer, that group, there is not a stiglitz-like voice in that group? you hear the critique all the time of what is missing on the economic team. what are your thoughts? >
. >> sreenivasan: wall street racked up gains today after the federal reserve chairman, ben bernanke, said interest rates need to stay low. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 91 points to close at 10,374. the nasdaq rose 22 points to close near 2,236. public and private sector workers walked off the job across greece today. it was the second 24-hour strike in the last two weeks aimed at a government austerity plan. demonstrators clashed with police in athens, after a peaceful march had ended. they were protesting plans to cut government spending because of a debt crisis. greece has announced wage freezes, bonus cuts and pension reform over the last month to save almost $7 billion. the u.s. house has stepped up the pressure on health insurance companies. it came a day before the president's bi-partisan summit on health care reform. health correspondent betty ann bowser has the story. >> this meeting will come to order. >> reporter: the target at a house hearing today was wellpoint-- the parent company of california's anthem blue cross. >> corporate executives at wellpoint are thriving
quickly got interest rates to zero. >> when dow, based on what the chairman of the fed mr. bernanke said recently, when do you expect him to begin or the fed to begin feeling like in order to combat inflation they have to do something. >> you know. >> rose: about raising the cost of money. >> i think the fed has made it very clear they don't think that that time is any time soon if you read their statements. they are very careful to say it is certainly a ways off. i think what chairman bernanke was doing was talking about a plan. and how, when it's time will the fed be able to drain reserves so people have the confidence to know that if they get worried, they can, you know, take the reserves out of the system so you don't have inflation. i like to draw the analogy t is very much what the president is doing with his budget, at the same time that he is saying we need to do some more energy spending to create jobs, sort of those targeted measures, we need to put in place a plan for as we come back to full employment, how do we deal with the budget deficit. that is exactly what he is talking
up at a senate hearing today with fed chairman ben bernanke. >> we have a situation in which major financial institutions are amplifying a public crisis for what would appear to be for private gain. i want to ask you here whether or not you think there ought to be limits on the use of credit default swaps to prevent the intentional creation of runs against governments. do you have any quick comments on that? >> using these instruments in a way that intentionally destabilizes a company or a country is... is counterproductive, and i'm sure the sec will be looking into that. we'll certainly be evaluating what we can learn from the activities of the holding companies that we supervise here in the u.s. and joining me with the latest on all this is roben farzhad, senior writer for "bloomberg business week" magazine. in general terms first, what exactly is chairman bernanke promising to look into? >> this has for the better part of the decade been the great big unknown, this world of derivatives which are largely unregulated secondary investment vehicles. they're almost train of thought.
a year. we'll have full details in tonight's "market focus". as ben bernanke was sworn in for a second term today, the federal reserve chairman said he was focused on protecting the agency's independence. bernanke said that independence is key to keeping monetary policy focused on the long-term interests of the american people, and not political whims. >> susie: you've probably noticed that the prices you're paying at the pump are holding steady these days. but can we count on them to stay that way? well, that all depends on what happens to the price of oil. and, as suzanne pratt reports, forecasts for oil prices in 2010 are all over the map. >> reporter: at this gas station in midtown manhattan, gas prices are among the highest in the nation. whether they spike even higher, head lower, or stay in the same range this year depends on who you ask. j.p. morgan's lawrence eagles expects crude prices, which dictate gas prices, to climb higher. that's after averaging between $72 and $76 a barrel in the first half this year. >> moving higher in the second half, up to $88 by the end of the yea
" lending now that financial market conditions are improving. >> tom: so what are ben bernanke and company thinking? where does the fed go from here? and what does it mean for the cost of credit? we get some insight from a fed watcher and a market pro. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, february 18. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the federal reserve took the first step today to bring the banking system back to normal. right after the market close, the fed announced it's raising the interest rate it charges banks by a quarter of a percentage point. >> tom: susie, the so-called "discount rate" is used by banks for emergency loans, and was cut drastically during the financial crisis. the fed raised that rate today, saying in a statement it's time to "normalize" lending now that financial market conditions are improving. >> susie: tom, the fed's move sounds
at worldfocus.org. >>> in this country federal reserve chairman ben bernanke said today he's looking into weather goldman sachs and other wall street firms may have helped push greece toward financial ruin. the issue is is the use of those credit default swaps, th serve as an insurance against risk and let the banks gamble that greece might default on its debt. ultimately they make it more expensive for greece to borrow money. greece's debt crisis played out on the streets as well. thousands took part in a protest yesterd yesterday. such a default would be among the first of the 16 country that is use the euro as currency. questions are being raised about how the situation was allowed to get so out of control in the first place. for more on that, we are joined once again by a senior writer for bloomberg business week. >> hi martin. >> this is a little confusing, let's try to follow along. there have been reports of several american financial service companies, how they helped greece mask how bad the financial situation was in that country. how did that work? >> on a day-to-day level,
to believe the date when ben bernanke moves it off zero is getting closer. c i don't see anything in that data. we don't look like greece. we don't look like spain either. people are up because we have had good news. >> take note. the front end is being held by the fed at zero. and the concerns are starting to mount. what you're starting to see is the stheppening but the growth is not as strong as people indicated originally. >> that's not how i read the data. long-range dates went up today, the date that we are taping because the philly -- there was optimism not pessimism. >> we have 1.7 trillion in the market. interest rates do not go up, which i think is a totally unrealistic assumption over time based on the sides deficits that we're talkingng about. >> and banked on what bernanke -- >> we can debate how quickly and fast but here is the key. even if they don't go up, the single largest line item in the federal budget within 12 years will be interest on the federal debt. larger than defense. larger than medicare. larger than social security. what do weit get for that? nothing.
do you regret? where did you look back and say "that was the wrong call, by me, geithner, bernanke"? >> charlie i've thought about this a lot and i'm going to give you a number of mistakes i think i was involved in making. but the in 20/20 hindsight, the major decisions we made, i'm totally convinced, were the right calls and they were made in the face of unprecedented challenges with really imperfect tools without the authorities we needed in the middle of a very challenging political period with an election coming. and the reason i they is they worked and they prevented the collapse. so most of what is cited as mistakes were really things we had no control over. for instance, i would like to have seen the a.i.g. problem coming earlier. but there was no regulator that had responsibility for the whole institution and we just didn't have a clear line of sight and we didn't... we didn't have the information. i do not want to have lehman fail. i knew that would be a bad thing and we worked very hard to prevent it. but we didn't have the authorities to prevent the failure of he plan. .
efforts by raising interest rates. chairman ben bernanke outlined the effort in written testimony for a congressional committee. bernanke said the economy still needs an easy money policy for now, but he added: "at some point the federal reserve will need to tighten financial conditions." the talk of higher rates kept wall street at bay. the dow jones industrial average lost 20 points to close at 10,038. the nasdaq fell three points to close below 2,148. thousands of workers in greece staged a national strike today, protesting a government plan to freeze salaries and cut bonuses. the 24-hour strike closed schools, and brought air travel to a halt. we have a report from john sparks of independent television news. >> reporter: it's easy to say, the 24-hour strike closed greece filed a test case for other indebted states. its huge socialist government plans been cuts. for many here on the streets of athens today it is not acceptable. "the capitalist government has declared war on the working classes. we will respond with war-like measures," said this mp. the government wants to raise
. ben bernanke and company were feeling more upbeat about the recovery at last month's fed interest rate meeting. in minutes from the late january meeting, policymakers agreed on the need to eventually raise rates, but they differed on when to start. meanwhile, the treasury says more americans are benefiting from the administration's foreclosure prevention plan. through january, almost a million homeowners had their mortgage payments cut, but those trial loan modifications have only been made permanent in 116,000 cases. walgreen's will soon be the corner drug store in new york city. it's buying duane reade for $618 million. the deal makes walgreen's the city, and the nation's, largest drug store. >> susie: the recovery in the hotel business has a long way to go, and 2010 will be another tough year. so says the man who runs intercontinental hotels, and the holiday inn and crown plaza chains. his cautious outlook comes a day after the intercontinental hotel group reported a 34% drop in quarterly profits. joining us now, andy cosslett, intercontinental's c.e.o. >> welcome to "nightly busin
garzarelli, president of garzarelli capital. wednesday, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke testifies on capitol hill about the state of the economy. and monday, we charge ahead with new credit card rules. they go into effect that day, so we look at how they'll affect the bottom line of banks. >> susie: profitability was not a safe bet for nevada casinos last year. casinos posted their biggest- losses ever. the state's gaming board says the industry lost nearly $7 billion in fiscal 2009. more than half of that-- $4 billion-- was in properties along the las vegas strip. the only bright spot, from a financial standpoint: people drank more! alcohol sales rose 2%, while revenue tied to casinos, rooms and food, all dropped. >> tom: a month after toyota's massive gas pedal recall announcement and we're learning just how busy some auto repair shops have been. two large toyota dealers, auto nation and penske auto group have fixed more than 17,000 toyotas each. penske says the accelerator problems cost $70 to fix. that's the cost to toyota. so based on penske's assessment, toyota may spend up
. >> do you think geithner in this administration and the previous administration, geithner and bernanke and larry summers have done a good job in hemming the financial sector as well as -- >> you know, 2020 hindsight is a specialty in this country and now we're having all kinds of hearings. but at the time this thing hit us in a significant way, those guys were working 18, 19 hours 0 day. they were making decisions with the information that they had available. they made mistakes. but the bottom line is, the system is still working. we are making progress. >> and we averted disaster. >> we averted two or three disasters. and i, therefore, applaud what they did, and if you notice, we support what they did. were there errors? sure. >> did i make judgments that weren't perfect? you bet. >> what does the chamber think about the boca rules. >> chairman volkert is a very smart man. and he raises a thoughtful argument. that press conference with the volkert rules and things the political guys threw in that was not naferred by geithner and sumners. but the volkert rules make since with one excep
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)